Legacies

People, as they age, begin to worry about their legacy. How will they be remembered? Will they be seen as having lived a life of value and consequence? Will they be appreciated for having lived a life of purpose and accomplishment? Were they a good worker? A good spouse? A creative person?

Of course, their curiosity is doomed to failure since they won’t be around to see how their legacy plays out. In addition, our legacies are experienced differently by different people. Here is an example.

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Great Breakfast!

The View from The Grill at Torrey Pines

The Grill at Torrey Pines at The Lodge at Torrey Pines offers a great breakfast. Sit on the terrace, watch the struggling golfers, and enjoy a fabulous eggs benedict or huevos rancheros dish.

There is free valet parking at the Lodge.

Reservations are usually needed on weekends.

Hey Senior Travelers!

  1. Do you have a passport?
  2. Do you have a Global Reentry Card?
  3. Do you have trip insurance?
  4. Do you have luggage on wheels?
  5. Have you left ample time between connecting flights?
  6. Have you considered upgrading to Business Class using miles?
  7. Do friends and family have your itinerary?
  8. Have you thought of breaking up long flights? For example, if you are flying to Paris from San Diego, consider staying a day or two in New York or Boston to make jet lag easier and reduce the burnout from flying 12 hours!
  9. Have you thought of using trains and drivers instead of renting a car in Europe?
  10. Have you thought of staying in hotels vs. Airbnbs that don’t have concierges?

Stretch, Stretch, Stretch

Psychologists are prone to back and tendon problems. We sit all day, and often our bodies are tense. Stretching helps bring a sense of well-being in addition to preventing injuries. The beauty of stretching is that you can do some form of a stretch anywhere. You can find many programs on the Internet.

Fore!

I have talked with some friends who have thought about taking up golf in retirement. If you enjoy being outdoors, hitting a ball around without much concern about how competent you become, then do it. See an instructor, get some tips on clubs, take a few lessons and go for it! Whether one takes up the sport or not depends greatly on who you are.

On the other hand, if you want to be a good player who is competitive with peers, give the decision some thought. Unless you are a gifted athlete, you can count on hours of practice and instruction at times without too much progress. Taking on the game takes a considerable time and financial commitment. It is an exciting game that can be very satisfying, but it is daunting.

September 2022

Memories


memories are like
melting icicles
on a barn in Vermont,
colored red
on a country road
where the deer run 
near the beaver ponds,
as the years slip by 
and the seasons change,
like a clock in motion
a sundial at work
in the time of our lives.

Rosina’s

Rosina’s is an Italian restaurant run by an Italian woman and her two sons. In a park-like setting in Santa Luz, Rosina’s is comfortable and peaceful. The food is excellent and priced reasonably. On Tuesdays, there is no corkage fee for wine.

14701 Via Bettona, San Diego, CA 92127

Travel by Water!

Many seniors can’t make the trips they once did due to various health problems. Does that mean we shouldn’t travel? No, the task is finding a trip matching your physical ability. In my case, I made many rigorous hiking and backpacking trips when I was younger. Arthritis in my back ended those activities, but I took my first river cruise a few years ago. AmaWaterways (Ama) was the company we chose to motor on the Danube from Bucharest, Romania, to Budapest, Hungary. Enjoying the company and that mode of travel, my wife and I recently completed a trip on the Douro River in Portugal with Ama.

Porto Portugal

So, how do these trips work? The structure of the trips is similar within Ama and from company to company, and I will use my trip to Portugal as an example.

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Don’t be a Curmudgeon!

Hospitals have their own cultures. Like casinos, there is no day or night as staff continuously arrive at a patient’s side with thermometers, blood pressure cuffs, needles, and orders to move a patient. Such intrusions can bring out the curmudgeon self in the best of us. 



When I was in a hospital years ago for my first hip replacement, I was amazed by the behavior of some patients. They were rude, demanding, entitled, and loud. I thought, who would want to treat them? Of course, that is the problem right there. Curmudgeon behavior is counterproductive. Common sense suggests that if you treat the staff well, they will care more about you. Your job is to get well; boorish behavior works against that goal.

Seriously ill people can’t be proactive and strategic in their roles as patients, but most of us can help our cause and leave feeling satisfied with our hospital stays. So, what should one do? The answer is not complicated.

  1. Give positive feedback.
  2. Be polite.
  3. Keep complaints to a minimum.
  4. Know the names of your caregivers.
  5. Use humor when you can ( I had a nurse who kept taking blood and I ended up calling her the Vampire Nurse. We shared  a lot of laughs).
  6. Ask questions. Accurate information can take the edge off a bad mood. It is easier to tolerate a procedure if you understand why it is done.
  7. Have an advocate who can help you if you can’t get the necessary information.
  8. Nowadays, most hospitals send surveys about a patient’s experience. Fill them out. Several times I have written letters to hospitals with specifics about positive experiences. Yes, the staff gets paid, but who doesn’t like to hear a positive comment?

Patienthood is an opportunity for creative expression. Doing it right can turn a potentially scary, unpleasant situation into one of mastery and accomplishment.